Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Leading Radiologist and Imaging Specialist Joins Institute

Children’s National Medical Center has announced the appointment of Nabile Safdar, MD, as principal investigator of the Bioengineering Initiative at the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation. A musculoskeletal radiologist and imaging informaticist, Dr. Safdar joins the Institute’s interdisciplinary bioengineering team to harness the full power of science and technology through a dynamically supported and fully integrated research and clinical program dedicated to accelerating advances in children’s surgical care.

“Before a surgeon ever operates, they review all available data to make sure they know where they’re going and what they’ll be seeing,” Dr. Safdar said. “Today, most of our views of the body, to draw an analogy, resemble a basic road map. We want to use advanced visualization, simulation and modeling techniques to make a quantum leap forward in how we view a patient’s body before surgery. We want to give surgeons a three-dimensional street-level view that’s more precise and enables the best outcomes for every patient.”

Dr. Safdar’s Institute research will focus on improving pre- and post-surgical evaluation through biomedical imaging and computational sciences, and improving the training of radiologists and surgeons in these advanced methods, including the use of computer assisted surgery. Read more.

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Institute Researcher: Propofol Has Low Risk in Pediatric Imaging Research Studies, but Risk Increases with Duration

Dr. Zena Quezado, director of the Pain Neurobiology Laboratory at the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, has published a study showing that propofol, a well-known anesthesia medication, has a low occurrence of adverse events for children undergoing research-driven imaging studies. The findings indicated a low incidence of adverse events and no long-term complications when propofol was used to sedate children for imaging studies that require them to be still for long periods of time.

However, propofol does show an increased risk for respiratory, cardiovascular, and other side effects if anesthesia is administered over a long period of time or if the child has other complicating factors, including some systemic disease or an airway abnormality. It is also the first imaging study to show an increase in risk to the child with each 30-minute increment a child was under anesthesia.

“Getting a child to remain still in an uncomfortable environment during a medical imaging procedure, such an MRI or CT scan, where bodily movement undermines the procedure’s quality, is a near impossible task, which is why anesthesia is commonly used,” Dr. Quezado said. “We know that propofol can be safely administered in pediatric research studies by well-trained anesthesiologists who are prepared to anticipate and respond to all events, which minimizes the risk of adverse issues. We are applying the findings of this research immediately in our own work, and will help others ensure that every study involving children is safe, ethical and effective.”

The study appeared in the June 7 issue of Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Read more.

Friday, June 4, 2010

NIH Researcher Joins Institute to Seek End to Children's Pain

"Unanswered questions drive me,” said Zena Quezado, MD, a pediatric anesthesiologist who has joined the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation from the National Institutes of Health. “We are research advocates for those with no voice – infants, premature infants, and developmentally disabled children.”

Dr. Quezado serves as director of the Pain Neurobiology Laboratory at the Sheikh Zayed Institute, joining a team of medical visionaries who are coming together at the Institute to re-imagine the entire pediatric surgical experience and create a new standard for surgical instruction and research. Dr. Quezado’s Institute research will focus on the mechanisms of pain response and response to novel drugs. In addition to her research duties, Dr. Quezado is also a pediatric anesthesiologist within the Center for Surgical Care. She will work closely with Julia Finkel, MD, a preeminent pain medicine physician-scientist and leader in the field of pain medicine.

At the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Quezado served as Chief of the Department of Anesthesia and Surgical Services at the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center. An active researcher, Quezado has published more than 50 peer-reviewed manuscripts in clinical and scientific medical journals.

Read the news release
.